Contact Lens
04 Apr' 16

Contact Lens

Thinking of Contacts? 

It was Leonardo da Vinci who introduced the first known idea of contact lenses. In his texts he actually described a method of modifying the power of the cornea by immersing one’s head in a bowl of water or wearing a water-filled glass hemisphere over the eye!

Contact lenses or CLs have evolved since into very thin lenses that are placed directly on the surface of the human eye. Worn primarily to correct vision; contacts are additionally used by health seekers for cosmetic or therapeutic reasons as well. People who want to avoid wearing glasses, to better their looks, wear contacts.

CLs are known to provide better peripheral vision than spectacles, and do not collect moisture from the environment or perspiration; making them ideal for outdoor activities. One can also wear sunglasses or goggles without having to fit them with prescription lenses.

Corrective CLs are designed to improve vision, most commonly by fixing refractive errors. This is done by directly focusing light so it enters the eye with the proper power for clear vision.

Correction of far or short sightedness involves the additional challenge of fitting the CLs with multifocal lenses or single vision lenses. 

Cosmetic contact lenses are designed to change the appearance of one’s eye colour. These lenses (by prescription) may also be equipped to correct refractive errors.  

Those with perfect vision wishing to buy coloured contacts for cosmetic reasons, still need their eyes to be checked for safety reasons so the lenses will fit the eye without causing any redness or irritation.

Therapeutic scleral lenses are large, firm, oxygen permeable contacts that rest on the sclera used by patients with severe dry eye syndrome. Scleral lenses are also used to improve vision and lessen pain and light sensitivity.

Therapeutic soft lenses are frequently used in the treatment and management of non-refractive disorders of the eye. Bandage contacts protect an injured or diseased cornea from the abrasion of blinking eyelids enabling it to heal.

Speak to the experts at the S10 Health SafeCare Network and make an appointment with the leading eye specialist in the city.  

Comments

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